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20121226
20121226
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. christmas break is already over for president obama. he's flying back to washington tonight and aides say he's ready for a deal. it's not clear whether this trip is a sign of compromises to come or another display of theater showing the president is willing to work even as his opponents skip town. meanwhile, though, americans are growing skeptical. in the last week alone, gallup found a 15-point drop in the number of americans who think congress will negotiate a deal on the fiscal cliff. that's not all, holiday spending also hit its lowest rate since the 2008 recession, which retailers are blaming on the uncertainty in washington. so where do we go from here? well, since the house failed to get a vote on the tax package last week, all eyes are on the senate. a temporary deal that would basically extend all the tax cuts for those making under a quarter million. the deal would also rescue long-term unemployment benefits and instead of addressing those automatic spending cuts we've all heard about that are set for january 1st, this temporary deal would delay them for another six months. few are
of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more than the democrats. president obama is basically going to do with the people voted him in for. i think he wil
but mandy has been celebrating boxing day all day. we didn't get any presents from lawmakers in washington yet. we're still five days away from falling off the proverbial fiscal cliff and wall street, like everybody else, is waiting for some kind of a solution here, and as you can see by today's numbers the waiting game continues, although we thank brian sullivan and you, mandy, for bringing us back to positive territory in the last hour. >> i'm not sure we can take credit but we'll take it. >> the dow is up a fraction at the moment. 13,139 after a meandering much of the day. the nasdaq hardest hit today. technology has been very volatile recently. still down a fraction right now. 13 points, fraction percentage-wise and the s&p is down 3.33 at 1423. five days left until the fiscal cliff deadline, and though the market has been very resilient to this point, what happens if we go over the cliff and if lawmakers cannot get it together come january 1st? will it be a big meltdown for wall street? that's what everybody wants to know. >> certainly hope know. in today's "closing bell" exchange, fo
see already, there is a different tone in washington. i think elections matter. the voters spoke. even though the race was relatively close, it was not that close in the electoral college. even the margin has expanded now to 4 million votes. i think people read those results. i think, for example, on an issue like immigration reform, the prospects for passing comprehensive immigration reform in the near future -- near future are much greater than they were three weeks ago because of the result of the election. i think the chance of coming to an agreement on this fiscal cliff are greater today because of this election. politicians read election results. i do not know whether our campaign or their campaign fostered the environment for that. i think the voters did, and that is as it should be. >> the last couple questions -- we will come back to this side. >> my question is, in the days following the election there was a fair amount of coverage about the divisiveness of the obama for america ground game -- i was wondering, how you need you think that model was for this campaign and candid
was that our supporters would read this and it would spend -- especially in washington, the world's biggest record chamber -- people would get nervous and worried. when those things happen, you find everyone very generous with their advice. [laughter] the frustration was less than we be worried about where we were but other people's behavior and that it would create a disillusionment among supporters. so we spent a lot of the campaign fighting back against some of these polls. what was remarkable about this race, as looking of the data that we had, it was not how volatile it was, but how steady it was. from february through november, we were running in our own data generally a two-point to 4-point lead. we never fell behind. there was a time in september, after the conventions, we had a strong convention and they had not so strong convention, and came the famous 47% tape. we got a six-point or seven- point battleground states lead. some republican leaning voters moved away from romney. and then can the first debate, which we strategically planned a little suspense for. [laughter] >> there w
of president obama sequestration policy. everyone here in washington is involved in this attack on our national defense capabilities from a financial perspective. the united states of america has limited funding. i would strongly urge us to use the $480 million being spent on the congo, instead being used to help to people in united states of america who are in need of help, or help reduce the deficit that was testified to be the greatest national security threat to the united states of america. it is a matter of priorities. i appreciate the very noble -- i emphasize the word noble -- effort to help people who are in harm's also way in various parts of the world. my colleague from florida mentioned somalia. certainly in vietnam we tried to do the noble things. we're in a different financial reality. in the absence of a national security interest in the congo, i am afraid that sequestration will force us to retract even though we may wish to the contrary. i yield back the remainder of my time. >> a couple of questions. sequestration is not only obama's, but also our responsibility. i believe we
vacation short and heading back to washington before we fall off of the fiscal cliff . can a deal be reached. >> a deadly winter storm unleashing snow and tornados . now thousands ever cleaning up and holiday travelers are stuck. i am tracking where the storm ised hading next. >> thank you, rick. take the gift card and hit the stores this morning. wait until "fox and friends" is over and then leave. "fox and friends" begins right now. "fox and friends". >> gretchen: good morning, i am gretchen carlson we are joined by clayton morris . rick as well . these are great guys, but clayton, because he is a tech guru of folks news and here to help all of us today. >> tech support this morning f. you have tech-related questions. send them and i will attempt to answer them all. i answered all of them. my wife said what are you doing on twitter? i said i am helping me. >> gretchen: we have big storms brewing and rick, you are aptly sitting to the right of me and you will help people get out of town. >> 30 tornados and a big one in mobile, alabama and more tornados and a blizzard. i will try
carolina. his 2009 "abigail adams" won the bancroft prize. holten is a finalist for the george washington book prize and national book award. his first book, "forced founders: indians, debtors, slaves and the making of the american revolution in virginia," won the organization of american historians 'mel kurdy award. i'm honor today introduce -- honored to introduce woody holten. [applause] >> first, i want to celebrate the wisdom ask and the congeniality of the fellow judges who gave up a half year of tear own writing to -- of their own writing to help find the fife amazing books that we present to you tonight. they are brad gooch, linda gordon, susan orlene and judith -- [inaudible] [applause] the other judges and i also want to give special thanks to sherry young who was our tireless and perfectionist liaison at the national book foundation. thank you, sherry. [applause] the finalists for the 2012 national book award for nonfiction are anne applebaum, "iron curtain: the crushing of eastern europe, 1845-1856" published by doubleday. and katherine boo, behind the beautiful forevers. [app
the authority to reprogram funds to increase diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. in a washington where too often we see the recommendations of panels ignored or deferred, as they were for a long time on even the 9/11 commission, i think the secretarys swift action underscores how determined she is to apply the lessons of benghazi. clearly, mistakes were made. we learned of those yesterday in stark terms about the mistakes leading up to the attacks. the report makes that very clear. one of the most candid and important observations was the failure by certain leaders to see the forest through the trees. there were clear warning signs that the security situation in libya had deteriorated. going forward, it is important -- and i think it is important for all of us to think in these terms -- we need to do a better job of ensuring a free and open dialogue among ambassadors, the embassy security personnel, and officials in washington for decisions on funding and staffing levels and security. as we draw lessons, i want to be crystal clear about something else. congress also bears some responsi
to washington. our chief political correspondent, john harwood, is with us. john, this feels very much like it might be the calm before the storm in more way than one. >> it could be if we go over the cliff and the storm would be generated by the markets and the loss of confidence in american governance and the american economy, but that's not necessarily going to be the case. we still have a few days left. a white house official told me that there have been no progress over the last couple of days, but an aide to senator harry reid told me there's still a 50/50 chance we get a mini deal that would put off the effects of the cliff at least temporarily and a 50/50 chance of that happening before january 1st. so even though there's a small number of days, sometimes the urgency of a deadline forces lawmakers to overcome differences they can't overcome otherwise. >> remind us, john, a mini deal is composed in the senate but still has to pass through house republicans and boehner or not? >> yes. and the question about the mini deal would be, what we're talking about, just to make clear for our v
-- >> can we do that in 2013? >> -- works. >> i know. is washington still capable of that? >> i predict that it will happen. i think you will have, just like we did then, you'll have people out here and out here that won't agree with that. but i think you'll have an operating majority to do something. i believe that will happen. >>> still ahead, we're joined by actor and director ben affleck and the emmy-winning star of "veep," julia louis-dreyfus. first, caroline kennedy with her new book on her father's presidency. we'll hear audio from jfk himself inside the oval office. irping ]hon [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping id
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12